The Glory of 1 and 2 Unit Courses

The Glory of 1 and 2 Unit Courses

I think some of the biggest “bang for your buck” value in Stanford’s education system is found in 1 and 2 unit courses.In my experience, 1-2 unit courses grant students low barrier to entry to the topic in question: the workload is not prohibitive of other classes, and the brief class time allows for a measured and specific introduction to a topic.

The Sound of Contemplation:  Learning a New Way to Listen at Stanford’s Contemplation Center

The Sound of Contemplation: Learning a New Way to Listen at Stanford’s Contemplation Center

Earlier in the quarter, some of my friends and I decided to check out the newly opened Windhover Contemplative Center. This building, which has been in the making since 2012, is located on Santa Teresa street, near a high concentration of residences and other residential resources.  We were interested to see exactly what a contemplation center offered, and so off we went. While there, I serendipitously ran into one of my friends who was checking out the shallow pond in the back. I asked him what prompted his visit to this new building, in case there was a particularly interesting or cool reason. I was not disappointed. Wes actually was checking out the Windhover for a class, Sound Art I (taught by Paul DeMarinis). After catching up at the Windhover, I’ve asked him more in depth about this class and how it was making him explore campus in an entirely new way.   Wes first told me why he was taking this course. He is a product design major, and wants to produce music when he graduates. For the product design major, Wes has to take a course that explores art and its aesthetics in some way; being interested in music, he chose Sound Art I. The class, he explained, is more about exploring your aural sense more than anything. It has three main projects, the first of which he was visiting Windhover for. Within the building there is a small, compact fountain that bubbles water from a dark recess; Wes was trying to record the fountain’s sound as well as light tapping on the floor. The first project’s purpose...
Casa Italiana: La Dolce Vita

Casa Italiana: La Dolce Vita

For my last year at Stanford, I am very pleased and excited to live in a themed self-op whose name is Casa Italiana. Basically, throughout the year I’m surrounded by a comfortably familiar community of housemates, have access to a kitchen all the time, and learn Italian as the year progresses. Though as of yet I’ve lived less than one week in Casa, I am sure that I will thoroughly enjoy at least one perk: the food. Now, I would say overall that I like Stanford’s food and the quality of the menu offered at dining halls. Last year in Florence Moore, I was literally less than a football field away from buckets of organic ice cream. I ate enough ice cream to safely say that I really like Stanford food. But the chef at Casa, Jose, cooks food on a totally different wavelength. Each meal feeds upwards of forty people and still manages to please everyone’s palette, more or less. I’ve just never had a surf and turf dinner that was as good as the one I had just a few days ago, here in my college residence.  The meals are of restaurant quality, in my humble opinion, from the beautifully prepared crab meat sandwiches to the bread you can have with olive oil and vinegar. Needless to say, especially since I love bread, I’m very excited to be living in Casa and eating out of this kitchen. In true blogger style, I had to capture a few pictures of the meals were being cooked ten times a week (and for the rest of the time, you can cook for yourself or eat leftovers)! Apologies...
Latin Class Field Trip to Special Collections!

Latin Class Field Trip to Special Collections!

As a Classics major concentrating in Latin, I (quite obviously) have to take Latin classes throughout the year. Today in Intermediate Latin, a course in which we’re translating Caesar and Vergil, we took a field trip to Green’s Special Collections—literally, a collection of special stuff. There’s the original script of Star Wars, the Gutenberg Bible Leaf, a bunch of rare maps, and pretty much anything you could think of…

How Admit Weekend Changed My Stanford Life

How Admit Weekend Changed My Stanford Life

When I went to my own Admit Weekend years ago, I had already committed to Stanford. Still, I was excited to visit the place I’d spend the next four years and to meet my potential new peers. I knew my mom was also eager to get onto Stanford’s campus and check out her kid’s new home away from home.

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