10 conceptions I had that Stanford proved wrong (Part 3)

10 conceptions I had that Stanford proved wrong (Part 3)

Athletes at Stanford break the stereotypical athlete mold not only in terms of who they socialize with, but also by being very academically-oriented. We are rewarded for our academic achievements just as much, if not more, as our athletic achievements. My coaches value me not just as asset to the team but as person, and have supported all of my academic decisions – I am free to choose any major, can take any class that first into my schedule, work in research labs, and do all the things any other student can do. In this environment, the Stanford student-athlete is equal parts a student and an athlete – not an athlete who happens to be in school.

10 conceptions I had that Stanford proved wrong (Part 2)

10 conceptions I had that Stanford proved wrong (Part 2)

Here, it is possible to live next door to someone for an entire year before discovering that they are the world champion of tetris, or gave a TED Talk, or managed a hedge fund back in high school. This is what I love about my classmates – despite their accomplishments, they are some of the most humble and down-to-earth people I know. Their accomplishments often go under the rug, unnoticed, and unearthed only by some serious search engine legwork.

Undergrads Aren’t Underlings: Crossing Paths with the Graduate Schools

Undergrads Aren’t Underlings: Crossing Paths with the Graduate Schools

When I was looking at colleges to apply to, I had been warned to be wary of schools that included graduate programs because “then they don’t care about undergraduates.” The people who said that must not know Stanford. As if the opportunities open solely to the almost-7,000 undergraduates are not enough to keep us all busy for the next 7,000 years, there is very little separation between us and the graduate schools. I have the most experience regarding the Business and Law schools so I’ve chosen to dedicate my post to those, but all seven schools (Business, Earth Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, Law, and Medicine) probably ought to be included (if I had the page space!). Ever since my first day at Stanford, I have received emails advertising various events that are held in buildings of the Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB). Some recent examples include: a lecture by Dr. Michael McCullough, Rhodes Scholar, Ashoka Fellow, ER physician, QuestBridge and SCOPE founder, discussing a non-traditional perspective on the premed path; a discussion with General Michael Hayden, former director of the NSA and CIA, offering his views on the justification, legal statutes, and effectiveness of NSA monitoring; and open-to-undergraduates-and-graduates breakfast information session slots hosted by Cicero Group, a data-driven strategy consulting firm. With amazing opportunities like these so easily accessible, spending time on the GSB side of campus feels totally natural. And the GSB’s Arbuckle Café, although it doesn’t take mealplan dollars, is a destination spot for hungry undergrads too! In the many happenstance encounters I’ve had with GSBers (sharing Arbuckle tables or asking for directions to...
Cultural Events and Clubs at Stanford

Cultural Events and Clubs at Stanford

While at Stanford, I’ve had a lot of opportunity to learn about the history, customs, and art of other cultures, and much of that learning has taken place outside of class. There are all sorts of groups and clubs on campus that celebrate and promote different cultures.

Pursuing Passions

Pursuing Passions

I’ve recently been impressed by the way that some of my friends have been not only exploring new things, but also pursuing their passions by creating art, designing and engineering products, and writing code. I want to jump off of my previous post to talk some great ways that you can go beyond the bounds of the classroom and dive into a topic or project that you care about in whatever field you’re interested in.

Page 1 of 3123

Pin It on Pinterest